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consequential meeting for markets and the federal reserve in terms of guiding markets and guiding the economy on policy here. i want to give you some tips that i think is a way to listen to bernanke today. i think you want to watch the forecast, the 2.6% gdp growth, the average for 2013 and the 7.4% unemployment rate. those could both come down here. unemployment could actually go either way, but i think it might come down here. watch the tapering guidance of the the market bet is that there is not a taper at this meeting, but bernanke could lay the groundwork for september or sooner. rates versus qe. listen to the chairman try to talk. we expect this, that he'll start to say, you know what, bernanke could strive to convince the markets that tapering does not mean a rate hike, and finally i would expect the third degree on the third term. expect many questions on whether bernanke wants to stay or if, you know, he's been fired. one thing i want to show you is the ten-year. we'll be asking the fed chairman about traits and whether the rise in rates is something that the fed wants to have happen
the obama economy? this is "special report." good evening, i am chris wallace in for bret baier. investors and traders on wall street are breathing a sigh of relief, thanks to a break from two rough selloff days in the financial markets. chief white house correspondent ed henry reports there's one man that remains on the hot seat, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke. >> reporter: after two days of market melt downs and high anxiety about 401(k)s plunging again, the last thing president obama or his aides wanted to do today was try to decipher the words of the fed chairman, ben bernanke. >> how is the white house sorting out what he said? >> here is what i have to say about the markets and the fed chairman and fed policy. >> reporter: nothing to say. probably smart because the market settled today, with modest gains for the dow and s&p 500 and a small drop for nasdaq, after a two day global selloff for stocks, bonds, and commodities, sparked by a massive credit crunch in china, refusal by communist leaders to intervene by pumping cash into the system, coupled with bernanke's comment that
an immigration system in our country that meets the needs of a growing economy, the biggest economy in the world that focuses on making our country stronger, not weaker, and hopefully will put this debate behind us. so i yield the floor. >> yield for a question. first could i say all of us who have had the honor of working with you and the senator from north dakota greatly appreciate the work that you've done. if there is going to be a broad bipartisan support for the final product it will be because of what you and the senator from north dakota have done. and i'm very, very grateful for that. and i think that it is important wouldn't you agree that people understand that this is a very tough bill. and it required a lot of cooperation from our friends on the other side of the aisle to go along and agree with this. i think that they've shown a great deal of compromise in order to reach this point and agree with us on this legislation, which clearly we need bipartisan support for. but i would like to ask the senator again for a couple of specifics. because i think it is important we understand how
mean for commerce and economy. >>> and now a backing off of a bid for sprint by dish, and they will concentrate on clearwire. >>> and also, a look at icahn stepping up dell bid. >>> and now the fed is wrapping up the two-day policy meeting this afternoon. investors hoping that fed will provide clarity about how and when the fed will wind down the bond buying program. make sure to watch the statement, and ben bernanke's news conference which is i perhaps more important, and it starts at 2:00 p.m., and one way or another, it is going to be nice to get something out of the way, wouldn't it? >> yes, i used to regard these events as big bad events when i worked at the hedge fund, because there could be relief even if he says the wrong thing and i'd love for him to address the 10-year, because it signals that the e kconomy is better, b it is not just weak. but if you address the 10-year, i'm in control and the bond vigilantes are not. i believe when this is over, we will come back and discuss -- i'm not kidding -- stocks. >> although, is it possible that the language that h
sweet. >>> federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has a little more positive view of the u.s. economy. but that sent markets tumbling. cnbc's andrew ross sorkin, my friend. >> hey, my man. how are you? >> i'm doing well. >> great to see you. >> congratulations, by the way. i'm probably two or three weeks late here, but it's -- it's been probably more than that but marv tlous watch you every morning. >> i know you miss me. we need to know why the stock market tumbles so strongly when mr. bernanke says we might stop something in the future but nothing is happening right now. >> because we've indicated for the first real time that we are taking the drugs away from the patient. that's what's happened here. this is all about whether we can handle it. it's sort of -- it's kind of like antibiotics. you are supposed to take them to a certain point and then stop taking them before they finally kick in and start to work. it's hard to gauge when you are supposed to stop with the medicine. and that's really the question right now. the market clearly feels that the economy isn't out of the woods y
. one of our supporters that says, liberty. immigrants contribute to our economy. immigrants pay taxes. we're actively mobilizing a lot of the important aspects of our economy. so when we are having a discussion about what is the living wage and how fast can we live on, right now, $14,500 is the living wage. they're talking about be giving access to services. we're creating a shadow economy of a community in perpetual -- >> i think the conservative movement in this country does not want immigration reform. it helps keep wages down like you're talking about. there is a mindset that is very strange. this came out of mouth of jeb bush. i want to you hear what he said about immigrants. here it is. >> we're going to have fewer workers taking care of a larger number of people that the country has a social contract with. to be able to allow them to retire with dignity and purpose we cannot do that with the fertility rates we have in our country. immigrants are more fertile and they love families and they have more intact families and they bring a younger population. >> what is your response t
the economy and improve relations with the west. >>> group of eight leaders are in northern ireland for their annual summit to discuss a wide range of issues including the conflict in syria. >>> "the guardian" newspaper says british agents spied on foreign politicians and officials in 2009 during a g-20 meeting in london. >>> iran's president-elect has held a news conference in tehran. hassan rouhani made a victory speech. he said his administration will rebuild the economy and improve relations with the international community. president-elect hassan rouhani held a news conference for the first time after winning majority of votes in friday's election. nearly 400 journalists attended. >> rouhani ime promised to improve the economy in relation to international. >> rouhani garnered 55% of more than votes. moderate and reformist groups came together to help him. but he'll have to work with hard-line conservatives if he wants to push his agenda forward as they occupy majority in the parliament. he'll be inaugurated in early august succeeded outgoing president mahmoud ahmadinejad. >>> l
. >>> the leaders of the world's wealthiest economies have shared their thoughts on everything from global financial markets to the civil war in syria. but they didn't always agree. the heads of the group of eight nations wrapped up their summit at a resort in northern ireland. they said they would take a tougher stance on money laundering, but offered few specifics. >> we launched negotiations on the biggest bilateral trade deal in history. we agreed a lock earn declaration that has the potential to rewrite the rules on tax and transparency for the benefit of countries right across the world, including the poorest countries of the world. >> the leaders agree that tax authorities in their countries would do more to share information. they want to better track the profits of international corporations to make sure they pay their fair share. they found less common ground on syria. >> it's no secret that there were very different views around the g-8 table. but we all share a vital interest in bringing this conflict to an end, and helping the syrian people to achieve the change they want. >> cameron sa
are noticing changes in the economy so they're planning some changes for themselves. ai uchida joins us from the business desk. what do they see? >> they've seen the housing market improve, consumer confidence, household spending. in fact when the chairman of the u.s. federal reserve looks to the future, ben bernanke likes what he sees ahead for the economy. the central bank has pumped billions into financial markets over the last several years, but bernanke says later this year the fed could begin slowing the pace of stimulus. federal reserve policymakers released a statement after meeting for two days. they decided to continue buying government bonds at the current rate of $85 per month. but bernanke says they could change their tactics as the labor market changes. >> and if the subsequent data remain broadly aligned with our current expectations for the economy, we would continue to reduce the pace of purchases in measured steps through the first half of next year ending purchases around midyear. >> bernanke said the jobless rate should be down to around 7% from the current 7.6% by the ti
reserve had fuelled gapes for months investing billions to get more money 234r0eing through the economy. the central bankers suggested that if the recovery continued, they could scale back investments. ben bernanke said they would evaluate threats and believe the risk for the economy have diminished. investors don't like what nay are hearing. they fell by about 3%. and they are hoping for more stability to close out the week. managers at japan's biggest banks have their own executives at bank of tokyo ufj agreed to pay $250 million to regulators in new york. they transferred billions to countries facing u.s. sanctions. they moved $100 billion to iran, myanmar and sudan in violation of new york state law. between 2002 and 2007 they carried out about 28,000 such transactio transactions. managers instructed employees to strip information from wire transfer messages that could identify countries and people subject to international sanctions. bank officials say they have been working since 2007 to meet obligations. they said in a statement that they are cooperating with the regulators. u.s.
't think the economy is that strong yet. that would be another conversation on the line, but i think the interest rate -- the jump in interest rates is more once again of a knee jerk reaction. >> do you agree with that, because it does feel as though we're kind of at an infliction point in terms of rates, and this has been a really big backup this week in rates even though we're still at historically low levels. >> as much as i love kenny, i disagree with the big guy. an overreaction, no. we aren't seeing an overreaction. big ben. came out with the bernanke belly flop when he inadvertently suggested that they can move the stimulus or even taper on unemployment target. went from 6.9% up to 7%. that was huge, and that's when the ripple effects and the tsunami came into the treasury pits behind me. they began selling it, and right now, sue, severe technical damage, so the treasury market, obviously 7 and above, 2.40 in the ten-year note is very difficult. equity bounced off this 100-day moving average of 15.75 which coincides with the multi-year high. a lot of people were caught offside
significant budget deficits. but because we have pursued policies to control costs, grow our economy, create jobs and stabilize our fiscal health, this year i'm proposing a budget that protects our social safety net, one that increases public safety, and one that invests in our city's infrastructure at unprecedented levels. and it is a budget that significantly grows our city's reserves. this budget is being delivered as san francisco's economy is recovering, going, and moving in the right direction. and san franciscans are getting back to work. in fact, our unemployment rate has dropped, as you all know, from 9.5% in january of 2011 to an astounding 5.4% just last month. (applause) >> i know, i know it has -- it has not been easy. we've had to work hard with our health services system, our care -- our health care providers, and labor to reduce employee health care costs. and because of our collaboration, we will now save $52 million over the next two years. and we've made tough but necessary choices on everything from escalating pension costs to reforming our unfair job punishing business t
of the city's economy that all city of san francisco benefits. all of the people who ride these buses are really benefitting everybody because they are not out on their own vehicles in the road causing pollution and congestion. they are getting around san francisco in the cleanest way possible and really contributing to what makes the economy strong. we are super excited about these vehicles for us and for our operators and mechanics and they are really a great benefit for all san francisco. i want to acknowledge some people. i have been a member of my board of directors, my bosses, chairman to director jerry lee, ramos, i don't know if anybody else is here. mohammed the director of public works and we are going to hear a little bit about how these buses are part of the public space. just like these are clean, we want to keep these clean. the buses here from input, from our operators, transit workers union local 258. the san francisco transit riders union. the mta advisory committee. a lot of folks working together, our fleet engineers, mechanics, supervisors, operators, most of whom
a whole bevy of coming in this economy that affects the management and the host company that is start ing in san francisco that want to plan with us and not wait for a disaster to hit and then find out that we could have accessed many people. that is helpful for the mayor to search for more partners and get ready and be more excited about recovery. when you look at what happened in new orleans and all the victims of tornados. they always tell you they could have been more ready for this had they engaged people ahead of time. this is what we are doing to improve these changes. if the economy gets hit by a major earthquake, that's an incredible hit to the rest of the country. we have to invest a lot more. that is one example of how we can use a lot more technology companies helps us with things that have challenged our cities. >> the likelihood of an earthquake is less than out here, although i have lived in city hall, working there one day when the building actually shook. it was the first that i noticed. everything did shake a little bit. it wasn't particularly frightening. right now we a
economy, then you're going to be shocked by the report "rolling stone" has for us tonight. that's coming up. also a shocking turn of events on the house floor as the house speaker brings crucial legislation to the floor and watches it go down in flames. i'll tell you why what's bad for john boehner is good for the country. >>> plus bailouts of struggling casinos? it is also something that is totally happening. we begin tonight with a truly rare bit of genuine progress from congress. excellent news that nonetheless has me seething with anger. here's what's happening that's great news and infuriating. making sure 11 million immigrants are given a road to citizenship is trying to pass a bill by a huge margin in the senate. they are called the gang of eight and the reason they think they need the huge margin victory is to put pressure on house speaker john boehner to bring the legislation to the house floor even though it it will almost certainly not have the support of a majority of house republicans. so that's the game plan. the goal is get 70 votes in the senate, a goal that has seemed, w
really changed. for the fifth time ben bernanke says though the economy sim proving they're stickg with the 85 billion a month bond buying program for now. but in sorting through his intentionally confusing remarks the market got worried the punchbowl would go away and all we would be left with is a hangover. bond sold off too. there are winners and losers. we'll tell you where youit in. joining me now harvard economics professor, jeff marron. thks for coming on the show. >> nice to be here. melissa: first and foremost, i watched the whole entire thing and the press conference afterwards. my goodness, it w long and boring but the markets gyrated up and down and they got something out of it. what did you make of the whole exchange? what was your take away? >> my overall take is that the fed is saying that they see the economy gradually improving and the market data and market forecasts and all th are saying the same thing. so th means it is getting harder and harder for the markets to convince themselves that these low rates are going to last forever and everybody's own for a long
debate in congress and the economy. jammer -- tim murphy talking about how obamacare is behind schedule. >> in a lot of ways, this is a challenge. we have a liberal democratic presidents who is not only been elected but reelected. yes projects i think are very wrongheaded. time.a challenging it is also an exciting time. trying to modernize conservatism to bring it in- line with the challenges that the country faces now. we want to help conservatives in the country think about how to confront the challenges of the 21st century. neither side is doing a good job of that. there's a lot of thinking about what the 21st century requires, in terms of change, to get back to economic growth and prosperity. to get back to a cultural revival that we need. is challenging challenging and exciting. >> more with national affairs editor on sunday. [captioning performed bynational captioning institute][captions copyright nationalcable satellite corp. 2013]>> at his poorly briefing, ben bernanke said that the fed might ease up on its federal stimulus plan this year. he also discussed financial regulations
is not only allowing inflation, but the fact that it won't come down. and now the u.s. economy has to take into account that and the move of rates and the 1.5% move in rates is a hard pill to follow. >> and scott n the last three or maybe four, the feds have come in, and they have said, i am short the 10-year and take a boatload and every year they are wrong, and perhaps now, but to this point, we are waiting for an appreciable move in rates for year and years and the fact that the economy may not stand on its own legs is curious to me. i am curious what you are hearing out there, as well, scott, in terms of the pain people are taking on the fixed income side, and those who are not short credit and obviously watching the equities sell off. >> the market, whether it is treasuries or equities, the market was probably hoping and probably against the better judgment probably that bernanke yesterday was going to sort of walk it back, and walk back the notion that they were going to mention taper org that -- tapering or going to do it any time soon and we know that the people you are talking abo
-- pumping billions and billions of dollars into the economy. is it possible that we have gone from a tech bubble to a housing bubble to a fed bubble? >> it's absolutely a risk. the real question is is this easing? all this billions and billions of dollars, trillions of dollars really of dollars the federal reserve has printed and pumped into the economy. have they created a real enduring economic expansion? can housing exist? can housing keep recovering even without ultra-cheap money? can the housing market keep rising without ultra-cheap money? can housing growth continue? that's the bet that ben bernanke has been making the past couple of years. the question is is the debt going to pay off, or will we be right back in this mess we were five years ago? >> isn't the case when former chairman allen greenspan greens retired, he was pummeled because of the housing bubble. isn't it the case, since greenspan left, we've become more liberal with our monetary supply as far as pumping more money into the monetary supply. money has been basically free for investors and businesses for the past seve
. bernanke said the fed could slow its bond line program later this year, as long as the economy keeps growing and unemployment falls. in a note to clients, renaissance marker research said we suspect the markets are significantly overreact into the process of tapering. rbc capital markets said one of the big surprises in bernanke's press conference was that the chairman did not attempt to walk back the recent rise in interest rates. bernanke said yesterday that tapering really was not that bad. kind of like taking your foot off the gas pedal in the car and hitting a nice cruising speed, not hitting the brakes. >> what he is doing is a lot like monetary drunk driving. >> we will get more clarity at the end of july. connell: thank you much. brian jacobson for us next. it is always good to have brian's point of view. to what level is your anxiety level at this stage? >> my anxiety level is very low. i understand that they have a centrally planned economy. they can marshal resources to prop up their banks if necessary. i am not concerned about the federal reserve cutting back on their ass
of different economies, but housing is key to the u.s. economic recovery along with jobs. how does it look to you? >> i come home from my travels i see it in my own street, that a developer bought the property opposite of us, completely overhauling the original house and building a new one right next to it, kind of noisy. sends me back in my travels again. the infliction point happened, i can tell you when it happened, whenity remortgaged and fixed, and from that moment on you've seen the tightening beginning, and this is going to be a very interesting challenge for the housing recovery as we get further indications from the fed tomorrow that there's tightening coming. that's already begun to affect mortgage rates, and if there's one thing that could cool things down it's going to be a sense that the party is over in terms of quantitative easing. >> diana, weigh in on that, you've made the very points that there may be a cooling of course, but as rates rise it may get people off the couch and into contracts. >> yeah. that's a very short-term phenomenon, and i'd be interested to hear from n
december kay and economies die." >> while we spend a lot of times talking about how poor economies can improve their institutions to get richer, we don't talk about how richntries can get poorer. >> rose: we conclude with george packer. his book is called "the unwinding: an inner history of the new america." >> i the book appeals to people who are of different political persuasions who say "that's it. that's what life in america has been this past generation. it's been a time of winners and losers, of old institutions that used to support middle-class people eroding and instead a kind -- a landscape where people are on their own and some people do very well and some people do not and the ties that have held us together as a people seem to be getting looser. >> rose: naill ferguson and george packer when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. ferguson is here. his new book is called "great degeneration: how institutions decay and economies die." in his book he argues that the west is in decline and he examines th
tapering i think will be symbolic. we have inflation high and i don't think to the economy is quite making it out what the fed is meant to be. i think we will see a bounce back here. >> would you say you want to buy here or wait and see if things settle out in more after wash-out? >> i would start to get money involved here. even during the run-up waiting for an opportunity to get into the market. here is an opportunity. you don't have to put everything in but it is time to move some money back into the market, cheaper valuations here. >> michael pento, how do you see it? >> first of all, mr. bernanke is a very confused man. he launched qe4 in january. january of this year. not only six months later, not even six months later, he lowers his growth forecast, takes down dramatically, his inflation outlook, and then for the first time ever, outlines a time line where he's going to get out of his quantitative easing strategy. so he surprised a lot of people on wall street and i got news for mr. bernanke. he does not control long-term interest rates and he has this economy 100% addicted to his
of america, this remains a vibrant place to live with a balanced economy. the american people must have a voice about what those rules will be. and congress cannot skirt responsibility to legislate. again, i would like to close here by thanking those who led this effort, mr. collins in particular, for leading the floor conversation. he has shown great leadership, working very hard. you came here as did other members of the freshman class to make a difference by supporting the reins act and i think you will advance that cause. mr. collins: it is easy to follow in the stoot steps. and we will work to continue that fight. i thank you for being here tonight. it is now with great pleasure, another freshman who has come from north of me in north compassion for his constituents. mr. holding: i thank the gentleman from georgia for the opportunity to discuss this administration's excessive regulations. we know the harmful effect that overregulations had on the economy and since taking office, president obama and his administration have continuously burdened the american people with an exceptiona
to tap the brakes on the feds' bond buying program designed to lower interest rates and spur the economy. fox business network senior washington correspondent peter barns has an update. >> good evening. the fed says the central bank could be getting ready to wind down the easy money policies it has been using for the last five years to help the economy recover from the great recession, the first to slow and then to go, the controversial bond buying program, known as quantitative easing, which helped keep interest rates low. so far, the fed purchased $2.5 trillion in bonds to help flood the financial system with cash, basically printing new money. purchases help keep rates low for auto loans, mortgages and business loans. the fed chairman had cars on his mind when he said his team could start reducing purchases later this year, if the economy keeps growing and unemployment keeps dropping. >> if incoming data support that the economy can sustain a reasonable cruising speed, we will ease the pressure on the accelerator by gradually reducing pace of purchases. however, any need to consider a
and breaking the news, the stories behind the headlines. if the economy is getting better, why did wall street have the worst day of the year and the walls, exclusive the man that co-founded apple with steve jobs, his interview tonight on a segway, a machine that nearly killed me once. we'll get around to talking about why. i want him to talk about the new upcoming jobs movie. >> nobody wants to buy a computer, nobody. >> how did somebody know what they want if they have never even seen it? >> also, government snooping taking us back to the days of the cold war soviet union. >> i want to begin on the tragic death of james gandolfini yesterday. we're learning more about the moments of his family found him in his hotel room last night. dan is live in rome with more. dan, what is the latest? >> reporter: well, we've been piecing together the tragic final minutes of james gandolfini's life. we know that he arrived at the hospital at 10:40 p.m. having been rushed in found collapsed in his hotel room in a five-star hotel here in central rome. we know he was traveling with his 13-year-old son. there
at the economy at large this commission has seen a last year increase in the activity. we've seen employment is up and property values are up the economy is much better than it was when the deferral fees were started. now are the deferrals still needed for it's hard to argue that the program then is needed like it was then. it's still an important thing in our tool kit if the economy would go south. there's no harm in providing industry and housing. in fact, once there was an initially period where the fees were being deferred and we are were not collecting any impact fees but the initial years are past and we have a regular stream of funding and the hard part of the program has been over. the case bruce before you said if the program were to say used we recommend are modifications standardizing the down payment it's 15 percent in parts of the city and 20 percent in others. we would recommend eliminating the seed fund. we learned that the down payment helps with the initial planning on the one hand on how we spend on infrastructure but the seed program is not as effective. and lastly we reco
that the outlook for the u.s. economy is still quite unclear and that would dovetail nicely with what are likely to be downward revisions to the fed's forecast for the economy. if you look at the march forecasts, they were still forecasting 2013 gdp at 2.5%. and while i don't think they will go down to the sort of level that the imf was forecasting at 1.9 last friday, down grading that forecast of gdp, downgrading their inflation forecasts to levels which they previously described as sub optimal should offer markets some reassurance that as much as bernanke will stress tapering probably is going to happen, it's a matter of when. and he won't pre-judge his options. it's not something which means immediately that interest rates are going to rise. one of the things that markets seem to have to gotten, that when the fed outlined its qe exit plan in 2011, it did actually say the first thing it would do was not raise interest rates but stop rolling off or reinvesting maturing debt. >> the other thing of course is they won't be buying any fresh stuff even when they stop. and tapering doesn't mean they
is in cities and metropolitan contraries because these are the engines of the economy, centers of trade and investment. top 100 metros so only one ace of the land mast, two-thirds of the population, three quarters of the gdp and on every indicator that matters, infrastructure and human capital and innovation. 75, 80, 85, 90% of the nations share. there really is no american economy. what we have is a network of metro economies and they're now stepping up and doing the hard work. >> but at the same time we all know that some of the toughest economic challenges are the state and local level. >> absolutely. but the great thing about metropolitan areas is they're not just governments. you know, the federal government is a government. state governments are government, metropolitan areas are networks. and we see that these networks are finding really creative and beneficial ways. >> rose: networks between what? >> networks of different companies, different philanthropic groups, different individuals, all coming together. they have loose or tight connections. and they can fund things more-- in
morning to you. leaders of the world's most powerful economies are gathering in northern ireland for a two-day summit. british prime minister david cameron is the host, and he's pushing for countries to share more financial information. leaders there also expected to discuss differences on some of the big issues. syria's civil war, free trade between europe and north america and of course global tax evasion. we'll have a live report from steve sedgwick on the ground in the next hour. >>> unions in turkey, they're on a owuone-day strike over the eviction of protesters from a park in istanbul. police and protesters clashed from sporadically overnight following a weekend of scuffles in the city. nbc's richard engel will join us with the latest in the next hour. >>> also in corporate news this morning, a large activist investor in smithfield foods is pressuring the company to explore a break-up rather than go ahead with that planned $4.7 billion takeover by a chinese meat producer. i don't know if this is going to make joe happy or not, but "the wall street journal" reporting that starboard va
and as the economy is growing and we lift all through the economy. and ways to have programs that reach into the community that provide opportunity for young people. and to have appropriate housing, that's something i am committed to. i want to hear your ideas of how to do that and strengthen the efforts. last year in district 11 we were able to fund projects for the parks and safety and to beautify the environment. and we had projects for young people as well. i want to grow in the commitments we made last year. we know the best way to support our young people with opportunity is to provide jobs for them. i am looking forward to see how to accomplish that with the mayor and my colleagues from the board of supervisors, thank you. >> thank you, supervisor avalos. i am mark farrell, i am the supervisor from district 2 and i am the chair of the budget committee. and it's an honor to be here with the mayor and supervisors. my priorities is to have an open and transparent budget process, that's why we are here. we are doing six of these town halls and we want to hear from each of you. and se
economy every day. my organization and employees are excited by the 5.4 unplug and write and excited about the new businesses coming in ,in the ideas of expanding open space, around civic center and -- plaza. what i'm deeply concerned about today and what i want to speak to you about is why we're moving forward with the new economy, and moving forward with tech and business coming back, and concern about the most vulnerable san franciscans. one bedroom apartment is averaging 3,000 a month. median income has reached 77,000 here in san francisco. i'm concerned about the draconian cuts put forward by the department of health that will hurt many of my employees who rely on the systems of care of their own welfare for them and their families. i am concerned about the workforce system that is not addressing individuals with huge implement gaps. there is innovation being put forwardboth to the mayor's office from the various groups to reform the work for system; there are new ideas on how to get homeless individuals back to work. these are expensive options. i hope that in the age of inno
is on boosting the global economy, but the war in syria is dominating diplomacy ahead of the meeting. our diplomatic editor says divisions are growing between russia and other members of the group are good -- group. >> i think there is some trust between two people, the foreign ministers john kerry, the u.s. secretary of state, and the russian foreign minister sergey lever of. when you go wider and the two administrations, there is not much trust. on the american side, they believe that russia is seriously supporting assad's ongoing onslaught which saw the fall of qusayr. i think that is one of the factors, that seriously worried the obama administration. are the russians really serious? or are they just talking about going to geneva and in the meantime trying to win the battle on the ground, giving assad a lot of assistance? the russians make the point that we have the assad regime to go to geneva. or at least they say they will go to geneva, while the americans -- their job was to bring the opposition to the negotiating table. they have not achieved that. the opposition has not signed o
to show the fed will continue to stimulate the economy. the dow soared 138 points, the nasdaq up 30 and the s&p by 13. gold sold off as oil gained. in the after-hours session, shares of lay-z-boy and adobe both initially rallied on earnings news. adobe beat estimates, but the future is in question. facebook will be out with its new big idea tomorrow. a new way to show photos or videos is highly suspected. and treasury secretary jack lew is giving up his loopy signature for a more traditional one he will use to sign banknotes starting this fall. larry shover of sfg alternatives joins us for trader talk. good to have you on the show this morning larry, and i am wondering how you are preparing for this fed day. - the way i am preparing today is just keeping the powder dry. clearly the smarter money - not to say that i am, but the bigger, smarter money - has been on the sidelines really for the past two to three weeks. a lot of big moves we have seen have been just dramatically done by hedge funds, futures, and fast money. so, i am keeping the powder dry. - it's easy to forget the other
a crucial role in our economy and vital role in our communities. mr. president, that was proven last night at 5:00 when the congressional budget office, this nonpartisan arm that we look to for direction with what things cost and don't cost here on capitol hill with our legislation, they issued a statement yesterday that this bill certainly, that's on the floor today, this bill certainly is good for the economy. as i will say a couple times during my brief remarks here, it's going over the next two decades, what's left in this one and the next decade, reduce the deficit in america by almost $1 trillion. of course as we've said here previously, previous to getting the report from c.b.o., this legislation is good for the economy and good for security. that's a good package. well, mr. president, these 11 million people need a pathway to get right with the law. a commonsense bipartisan reform proposal before the senate will help them do just that. it will reduce illegal immigration by strengthening our borders. it will fix our broken immigration system and crack down on unskraoup less employer
about how the economy is still a bit dicey and jobs aren't being created fast enough. now they're thinking he just wants to put everybody to work, he's not worried about the bonds. bondholders are saying to heck with this, you're not going to protect us, economy is way too strong for bernanke to keep buying bonds, he can't keep rates down, he shouldn't even try. the owners of bonds aren't as worried about the ongoing drag of the federal government that bernanke's fretting about and talked about today. they aren't worried about higher taxes, sequester spending cuts or any lack of any serious attempt by elected officials to get hiring going. they are selling their bonds right now before things get so much better that those bonds will be worth even less! to understand how bonds work i've got to do something different because i know a lot of people can't tell the difference between a stock and a bond. so i'm going to -- i'm going to do a little fictional analysis here. imagine that the united states is a publicly traded company. and it's got this really counterintuitive stock that
the miners who were farmers and to create a new economy for san francisco and haven't we brilliantly and completely made new economies and so many knew that we have to name the latest new economy of the economy of invention and creativity and isn't that what we were doing in the gold rush and so it was stunning to be here with all of you who have made this possible. in 1900, the community worked with us to move up here in this area of a water front, and more of a lagoon area where we could congregate better and save the area where fisherman's wharf had been for the commerce that was needed to sustain our city. as the most of the logistics changed and as the needs changed as a community it was fisherman's wharf that helped us to envision what could be the future. in almost 50 years ago, the discussions began, how to enlifen our water front and how to keep it a working water front as we have here with all of us, as visitors, as those folks who are enjoying the great suit that they have to offer and the wonderful open space and also the working ferries that are helping to transport us a
university, about the state of the u.s. economy. later in the program we will be joined by a matthew segal. he will be here to talk about issues important to young americans. you are watching "washington journal." we will be right back. ♪ >> when you talk about transparency to the american public, there is -- you are going to give up something. you are going to be giving signals to our adversaries as to what our capabilities are. the more specific you get about the program, the more specific about the oversight, the more specific you get about the capabilities and successes, to that extent you have people sitting around saying, "ok, now i understand what it can be done with our numbers in yemen and in the united states and consequently i am going to find another way to communicate." there is a price to be paid for that transparency. where that line is drawn, in terms of identifying what our capabilities are, is out of our hands. if you tell us to do it one way we will do it that way. there is a price to be paid for transparency. >> robert muller makes his last scheduled appearance before
it is going to affect the economy. to hear the cbo, congressional bull crap office. [ laughter ] >> they say it's going to help the economy and help the deficit, i don't think so. >> charles: it's hard for me to believe that. cbo scores something and all these things we spend trillions of dollars but somehow we save money. >> it's like obamacare. i'm trying to think of an anti-union angle here. >> i mean i want to correct ben on one thing. he made the point that immigration is basically to meet demand for labor, not to drive down the cost of labor. what is about this, we don't have a demand for labor, for hard labor. they are still bringing people in. i don't get it from the left. they say they are for the poor and everything to get benefits out basically help the poor, it doesn't help the poor, it hurts the poor. it drives down wage rates. >> actually, if you look at the cbo report wages will drop slightly for lower income americans and higher for middle, middle group that won't have a negative wage impact. i have the union argument. if you unionize mcdonald's prices will go up if the wages
at discussing world trade and what to do about the ailing economy, the two-year war in syria is expected to dominate. susan mcginnis is in washington. susan, good morning. >> good morning, anne-marie. security is tight at the lakeside golf resort where this summit is being held. along with syria, another topic that might come up is some top-level eavesdropping among foreign diplomats. president obama is in northern ireland to meet with world leaders at the g-8 summit. syria is not normally on the docket but is expected to dominate the talks following president obama's move to ship weapons to rebels fighters. >> there are very big differences between the analysis of what happened in syria and who is to blame. >> russia is noun to have given weapons. president vladimir putin says the rebels in syria are terrorists and barbarians who have even practiced cannibalism. >> are these the ones you want to support? are these the ones you want to supply with weapons? >> president obama and pr putin are expected to hold private conversation this afternoon. the conversation comes after a new report r
economy the war in syria is about to dominate. >>> security is tight at the lakeside golf resort where this summit is being held. along with syria, another topic that might come up is some top-level eavesdropping among foreign diplomats. president obama is on his way to northern ireland to meet with world leaders at the g-8 summit. syria is not normally on the docket but is expected to dominate the talks. >> there are very being differences between the analysis of what happened in syria and who is to blame. president vladimir putin says the rebels in syria are terrorists and barbarians who have even practiced cannibalism. >> are these the ones you want to support? are these the ones you want to give weapon ons. >>> the conversation comes after a new report reveals the u.s. and uk spied on ryu shorthand others at another summit. the "guardian" newspaper says it has evidence that they spired on the london summit of 2009 hacking into smartphones and reading e-mails. the source? edward snowden. >> how much damage he did do? the fact is that time will tell. >> on cbs's "face the nation," ch
. thank you for coming on tonight. >> no problem. gerri: in an unrelated story, is the economy about to hit the brakes? there has been slowdown for the past three years. kennedy avoided if this year? with more on this, we have with sam saunders a chief investment strategist for charles schwab. i want to get to this idea of the economy in just a second. but first, i would like you to respond to this pink newspaper about how ben bernanke may indicate exactly what he's going to apply the brakes on easing this week. we expect to hear from him on wednesday. what do you say? >> i'm not so sure that that is shocking news. this has been building to the point where it actually starts tapering off. they have been transparent. to think about this a few months in advance, i'm not so sure that i understand why this is newsworthy be one you may be calm, but the markets were not. where do you think the professional traders are thinking about this right now? >> the market is having little tantrums. but it's not a big surprise. we know what the fed has done is unprecedented with quantitative easing a
he grew up. he grew up a blighted -- i shouldn't say blighted, limited, rustic economy. he. s to blow that up through canals, railroads, steam boats, things that connect those backwoods to the markets so we have a more diverse economy where people with diverse interests and tall ens have various ways to rise. the other element of it is opposition to slavery. obviously, it blights the opportunity of an entire class of people by definition and also blights the opportunity of poor whites in south who can't compete with the plantations that have the advantage, the brutal and horrible advantage of being anyone to used forced gang labor, which is awful, but is highly efficient. slave states are places that poor white people remove from, rather than go to, which was true. so the civil war fundamentally for him was about preserving our free institutions that guaranteed opportunity. >> it's so interesting because the economic part of this is at a time of great expansion in the country, prior to the civil war, there was recognition that the extension of slavery into the free states was the grea
economy. the federal reserve raises its predictions for growth and jobs. anthony mason on the new outlook. the director of the f.b.i. surprised many today with a frank answer to this question: >> does the f.b.i. use drones for surveillance on u.s. soil? >> pelley: bob orr on the f.b.i.'s program. this is supposed to be the answer to america's biggest nuclear contamination problem, but it's billions over budget. carter evans investigates. and ken moreis' great-great- great grandfather is a giant of american history. jim axelrod on how a powerful legacy changed one man's man'sn. mission. >> frederic douglas said it's easier to build strong children than repair broken men. captioning sponsored by cbs >> pelley: good evening. it doesn't happen very often but it happened today-- the stock market plunged in reaction to good news. the news from the head of the federal reserve was that the economy is doing better. here's the part wall street did not like. ben bernanke said the economy is doing well enough that the fed is likely to ease back on one of its stimulus programs, a bond buying program t
the big concern here on wall street was china. the once-booming chinese economy-- now the second-largest in the world-- is beginning to slow down. wall street is worried that the chinese government is not acting fast enough to boost its economy by injecting cash into a tight cred chinese banks have become reluctant to lend to each other. overnight, interest rates shot up by double digits according to wall street trader ben willis. >> this is a natural correction we've been looking for. we can blame it on ben bernanke, we can blame it on china, we can blame it on greece. >> reporter: but with credit tight, investors who r worried chinese consumers won't be able to buy as many goods from the west, hurting other economies. but willis remains optimistic seeing opportunity if falling stock prices >> we love this. this is what we live for when you have this kind of volatility. this is a dream for us. that's why you're in the business. >> reporter: this is when you make your money. i >> exactly. >> reporter: and with the dow rising more than 12% so far this year, stocks were selling at
economies in terms of -- because they need europe to be able to take their stuff. watch for china -- i don't know who's really running that country, but i can tell you this, their deceleration in economics is just incredible. it's not bringing us down. >> china may go down below 7%, 6% growth this err year. we are right now the tallest building in elmira, new york. >> it's the shung kamao bank. >> how do you know about elmira, new york? >> i come to play. >> you do come to play. we may be the tallest building in elmira, new york, but people keep buying the dollar. what are you going to do? go to europe? go to china? they're all train wrecks wait to go happen. >> you can't feed china. that's a big issue. 700,000 recespiratory deaths la year. let's go to john meacham. speaking of smoking, he smokes way too much. john, you look at europe, the g-8, they were all lecturing president obama three years ago. sarkozy, where is he now? who knows? he's probably staying at your place in the south of france. >> oh, no, unh-unh. >> but united states is in this strange position of just sort of crawling a
, but they are not focusing on the right thing which is growth, growth, growth. the european economy is in a six-quarter double dip recession. the u.s. is sub par. japan is trying to reignite, and i'm especially critical of european monetary policy which is way too tight. and speaking of monetary policy, our markets are more obsessed with it than ever. strong stock buys this afternoon, based on just one reporter from "the financial times" and his ill-advised, uninformed conjecture about what the fed would do, and then when that same reporter tweeted everybody that he really had no idea what he was talking about, well, stocks regained most of their losses. crazy story. an nsa leaker edward snowden points his finger straight at the big tech companies. they said they should resist the government's demand for user information. wrong. they should abide by all our laws, especially national security laws. all those stories and much more coming up on "the kudlow report" beginning right now. >>> let's start right away with cnbc's michelle caruso-cabrera. she is covering the g-8 summit. michelle, good eve
many financial stocks particularly those exposed to the domestic economy. david: okay. >> the u.s. is well-capitalized -- david: i have to put you on pause there when you're on financials. we'll take issue with you. we have earnings coming in from oracle. jo ling kent what do the numbers look like? >> dave, we have an 87 cents per share eps which is exactly as expected. $10.95 billion which is a miss on revenue. breaking down numbers a little bit, we see a quarterly revenue of $849 million. what is interesting, new software license revenues were up 1.4% to 4 billion. they were expecting to see this go from, between 1 and 11% that is certainly on the low end. that is a very important area for oracle to grow especially if other companies get into this market. david: i want to go back to todd. we have a lot of news to cover i don't want to focus on any one stock but does this tell you anything about oracle? >> this is common throughout the entire earnings season. miss on the top line. that is the whole story. oracle looks pretty good chartwise. with the current market conditions it
, risks have diminished. the economy is getting better and tapering off will continue. he gave as you very specific timeline for tapering off of the bond purchases. all that weighed in on the market. the question is whether this is it or there are worst times to come in terms of a selloff t was a selloff and it was instigated by the federal reserve. cheryl: dow is down 205 points. we really had a vast breadth of selling in the last five minutes. david: that is the intraday low for all of the markets as they all take a dive below 1:00%. "after the bell" begins right now. cheryl: let's get right to today's action. we had a lot of it. bret says be prepared for a pullback. you got one day. larry hilsenrath. director of research who says there is one indicator no one is talking about that could determine when the fed tapers. of course mark sebastion in the pits of the cme. mark, i want to start with you, what a day especially when you look at swings in treasury price, volatility there, dollar, gold, what was the top of your radar today? >> the dog that is wagging the whole market's tail is 10-y
the economy may not be enough to draw the sim lus in fine 13. what's that mean? in 1937, when we were coming out of the great depression, the white house and congress decided things were bouncing back strong! strong enough that it was time to start closing the deficit by raising taxes and putting less financial support into the economy t. fed agreechltd hey, come on, man, it was a first class disaster. >> the house of pain! >> it turned out to be a recession within a depression. now the president and congress have raised taxes as a part of the fiscal cliff deal. they agreed to the sequester, which was supposed to cut the defend spending. it is impacting a lot of little programs the media isn't focused on. wetion heard much about it. the fact that they're at 52-week highs, makes it seem like the sequester doesn't matter at all, who cares? government just doesn't know what it's doing. that's not the point. the point is neither the president or congress is doing anything extra substantive to get it moving beyond what it's done. we have for the interstate highway to build out over ike. we have n
of a timetable on it, saying if the forecast for the economy goes as planned, we'll start reducing the amount of -- combination for the economy by the end of this year and we'll end it next year. he tried to go to great, great lengths to say, you know what, that doesn't mean we're tightening on the economy, just we're not stimulating the economy as much as we do before. >> we've seen the market drop even lower today. there is some thought that that might actually have to do with what's happening in china as well. can you talk a little bit about that? >> i think that's a piece of it. we got negative data out of china that was a bit of a surprise. there's concern about the chinese central bank there, the people's bank of china clamping down on bank lending there so maybe you'd have what you call a hard landing where things would stop a little more abruptly than had been anticipated. the data out of the u.s. was a mix. we're kind of feeling our way along here. i think the real concern for the markets right now is does the fed make a mistake here? does it end up withdrawing the stimulus from the
in the way of strength six months out. >> i think the market raises strong free economy. hastens the day that the fed starts tightening. add to that bernanke's laying down of punitive timetables which he said umpteen times is tentative. may not to a defense and the economy. the market does not want to hear any of that. if he says that the assumption is, oh, he will stop doing it tuesday are something like that, which is that going to. lou: he made big references to inflation. he made references to unemployment or at least the six and half percent level as part of construction for his decision . is a little surprising to me. and it suggested that he does want to accelerate things year. are there signs that this quantitative easing combined purchasing program, this is having a negative, a deleterious effect on the fed's goals? >> i do not believe so. it is not -- it is not the sort of thing you would think would drive down inflation. inflation has fallen well below the fed's goal, but -- but the people who are worried about qe are worried about the other direction, inflationary. it probabl
-- the problem is the timing of all this. are you telling me the economy is so good now they can stop this program, this $86 billion a month in just a few months if the economy improves? payroll not getting better. trading fulltime jobs for parttime jobs, so seeing individual savings rates plummet. and at the same time our manufacturing base is not doing so. we this economy is maybe in first gear. now the federal reserve board, who hasn't accurately predicted anything about the economy over the last four years and has never predicted a recession, says, okay, we think now we're getting close to the point where we can pull the stimulus out of the market. nobody gets it. why now? we don't have enough traction here to do this. >> jerry, you talked to individual investor, portfolio people, not the manager. should they continue the course, keep the regular purchases or dollar cost averaging? >> they should absolutely. but a lot of the folks who watch our show don't like what they've seen in the market. they tone like the way we got to the rally. the think it's all about ben bernanke and the
, thank you. >> a little background on brazil. it's one of the world's largest economies coming in as number six. it was ninth in gross domestic product, it's expected to grow a 4.2%. inflation is up at 6.7% for the past year. rising rate fueling concerns there may be a another round of interest rate hikes. poverty rate stands at 21.4% with more than 41 million people considered poor. we will continue to follow the unrest in brazil. coming up later this hour, rick grenell the spokesperson for the last four ambassadors to the u.n. he will join us live. >> gregg: immigration reform is debates the turn in spotlight. next week on capitol hill, but can u.s. scenarios behind the bill actually gin up enough support for its passage. elizabeth plann has the story live from d.c. bureau. >> the immigration reform bill starting to take shape in the senate while republicans in the house continue to form what they think is a solution. just as the president says it's a pathway to provide citizenship for folks that wanted to come here and stay here legally while bringing relief to a struggling
and the effect on the stock market in t e we have to ask ourselves this economy ready. therthey see bernanke steppi bak saying it will not happen immediately but it is going tt happen. it has the investors very concerned. charles: and economy bumping along at 2% per year, is it worth it? >> we should not lose sight of the fact ben bernanke, is reected the most basic level the economy is improving. we are not facing the crisis we have faced for so many years now. reacting to what the meanings of these things are, but i choose to see it as the cup half full, getting the worst behind us. which is very encouraging news. charles: at them, what do you make the idea of the stock market should come down ha and fast what is suppodly good news. >> veryone who is in the market has to choose what it is they are interested in as an invest please send i am an investor. i don't carehat happens today or yesterday with my personal investment in the way i approach the market, that is somebody else's problem. those people i am not saying they'rr using poor judgment or acting irrationally, i choe to understand
the reason the fed would taper. the reason the fed tapers is that the economy is markettedly better or marginally better. the fact is it's seen as a negative somehow. we got better than expected housing data today. that's not holding on to the gains. the narcotic association -- national association of home builders index, right hand of the screen, rose from 52 to 42 in may, the highest since 2006. today, the engines roar, kicking off the start of the paris air show, the show where the top airlines and all the big makers show us and show their wear. is shares of boeing like what they saw today. shares of boeing at a new high after a ceo had confidence in the brand new batteries they reinstalled in the dream liner, and it received an order for ten 787 10x. that's good news for boeing. nicole on the floor of the new york stock exchange, the spy case, and silicon valley opens the books to the government because the government asked for information. we'll get more on that story. and we have a cautionary tale of china being the spoiler on detroit's comeback. yes, detroit's auto world come
to start closing the deficit by raising taxes and putting less financial support into the economy. fed agreed. hey, come on, man, it was a first class disaster. >> the house of pain! >> it turned out to be a recession within a depression. now the president and congress have raised taxes as a part of the fiscal cliff deal. they both agreed to the sequester, which was supposed to cut defense spending. it is impacting a lot of little programs the media isn't focused on. we haven't heard much about it. the fact that they're at 52-week highs, makes it seem like the sequester doesn't matter at all, who cares? government just doesn't know what it's doing. that's not the point. the point is neither the president or congress is doing anything extra, anything substantive to get it moving beyond what's done. we have no interstate highway to build out over ike. we have no wars, fortunately, like world war ii. we don't have a problem to fix bridges and tunnels. i often think the pipeline companies and google, google are doing more to help infrastructure and the government. into the breech comes ben
talk about here today. but what, and how do we bring the costs down? economies to scale, we know the. the more you produce is something, we've got to do this. that's going to be ultimate, one of the money decisions we have to make. one, do we need this plane? i think we do. secondly, can we afford this plane? and how do we afford it? do want to talk about that a minute? >> thank you, senator. i agree we need the airplane. can we afford the airplane is the question, not just the committee but us as well. >> american people. can we afford not to do it? >> i don't think so because there is no other option right now. and what we are asked to do is pretty well defined by our national guidance and by our defense strategic guidance. and based on that requirement that's handed to our services in the air domain, this airplane is something that we need to me commission we've been assigned. if the mission changed dramatically, if there was no intent to be worried about threats from other technology that develops in the future, if there is not a requirement, if the united states to build objecti
. and the double hit of the weak chinese economy and also the fed's tapering continue to weigh on this sector. back to you. >> thanks for that. let's recap what happened in the u.s. as well. selling off for a second day. dow, s&p 500 suffering their worst day of the year. dow down 254 points. highest one day percentage drop since last november. all 30 components down with 29 of the 30 dropping more than 1%. s&p had its worst one day percentage drop since november as well. november 2011, i should say. all ten s&p sectors were down more than 2%. 96% of the stocks listed on the benchmark index ended in the red. the vix, the markets fair gauged up more than 23% to its highest close since december. joining us for more, charles steeple, head of market strategy at lloyd's bank with us for the best part of the first hour today. good to see you. it's been described as sort of a big unwind of leverage. the thing that's striking about this, of course, actually what was the hedge yesterday that paid off? maybe if you were long in the vix. otherwise you were pretty much whammied. >> yeah. i mean, it's -- heads
much that is costing the european economy, european jobs, and the european government? guest: at the moment, we are asking our citizens to do a lot of sacrifice in order to adjust to the impact of the financial crisis. we cannot allow a number of people to escape, a number of people to evade their tax responsibilities. so, i think this was a powerful message from the g8. very much supported and initiated by the europeans to make sure that our tax system is assumes itsverybody responsibilities in terms of and that when we ask normal citizens to make sacrifices, we should at the same time ensure that any of the people that tries to escape this sanctions -- is sanctions. cooperation among states is an effective one, and this is what they discussed in the g8 and what we are implementing. we are happy to see that we are on the same wavelength with the americans. host: what about switzerland? is which alone one of those locations used as a tax haven? guest: switzerland is not part of the european union, but we have a solid relationship with switzerland. we made a number of agreemen
, professional sports. die-hard the know where to begin, a vast amount of the economy is based on taste and subjective values. there is no reason why there couldn't be a society in which we do get paid for social media, the other people do. what is the point of that? and here is where there is a leap of faith required. capitalism can work. markets can work. markets work when they start helping people coordinate to create more wealth and more positive effect for each other than they would have otherwise and when you have a market that grows as a result more people are better in the trading system that sharing system. that happened again and again and it is the real effect and is entirely appropriate especially for information network. so yes, you would be paying but you will also get paid. the nature of getting paid would be unlike any payment anyone has experienced before. we are used to the idea that you pay for stuff more often than you get paid. you only get paid every two weeks for your salary or whatever royalty check and always buying your coffee and spending in little drips and d
the eurozone economy, arguing that recent signs of market stabilization mean that the ecb's interest rates are becoming a more effective tool again. we'll see about that. >>> also, g-8 leaders are wrapping up a summit in northern ireland today. british prime minister david cameron has, of course, been the host. he says the goal of the group is to "fired up our economies and drive growth and prosperity around the world." we're going to have more, of course, from cnbc's steve sedgwick, who's on the ground there in that beautiful live shot in about 20 minutes. >>> meantime, time for "the global markets report." we'll go across the pond not to ireland, but to london, where ross westgate is standing by this morning amid a sea of green. a little bit of red around. how are you doing, ross? >> yeah, hey, andrew, pretty good. we're actually at the best levels of the session today here for european equities. advances out-pacing decliners by around about, what, 6-2, 7-2 on the dow jones stocks 600. it's been a mixed morning, but the ftse 100 now up 0.8%, despite the that is correct if inflation numbe
that actually is a good balance and works for everyone in this sector of the economy. this bill first creates a way for current undocumented workers to obtain legal status through the blue card program if they've worked at least a hundred workdays or 575 hours from january 1, 2010 through december 31, 2012. all the blue cardholders will receive biometric identification. employers will be required to provide a record of their employment to the department of agriculture as well. and to be eligible, then, for a green card, the workers must have worked for at least a hundred days per year for eight years prior to enactment or 150 days for five years prior to enactment and they also would have to show that they pay taxes on their income that they earn while in blue card status, that they have not been convicted of any felony or violent misdemeanor as well. next, the bill also establishes an agricultural worker program to assign work visas for immigrant workers who don't wish to live in the united states but want to be able to come to the united states to be able to work legally. workers must regis
pleasure, thank you. >>> next in the money lead, the head of the fed says the economy is improving but free money is still flowing. so where do we stand now? plus, amnesty, the word that might kill the immigration reform bill. many conservatives coming to washington are fed up. i will ask democratic congressman castro whether he thinks the immigration reform bill has a chance in the house. [ indistinct conversations ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. ♪ hooking up the country whelping business run ♪ ♪ trains! they haul everything, safely and on time. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people, making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big country mo
in the largest wely gain in four years. the sooner the fed pays it out, presses on buying. hurting the economy more than it has helped. editor-in-chief steve forbes, great to have you with us. qe appears to be at an end, sort of. $85 billion continues, the rates are moving higher, so that will be problematic. your thoughts on the timing on all of thisy the fed chairman. >> three years late, better late than never, what ben bernanke has done inadvertently this make it easier for the vernment to deficit spending, get back on their feet, issue newonds but for the rest of the economy, smaller businesses like with what they said in russia, health care is free but you can't get any. they a thehe job creators, they are hurt by what bernanke did. not much left for the small guys. lou: a lot of lilimited government, some of them are anti-fed. oh, my gosh, we cannot conclude it a $5 billion per month. i do not like what he has done, bbt don't let him reverse course here. there is a chorus of hypocrisy in pleading for more punch bowl, please. >> it is hard to give up when you have it. bernanke will not d
would scale back the stimulus program which has helped fuel the stock market church. >> if the economy is able to stay in a reasonable cruising speed we'll ease the pressure on the accelerator by gradually reducing the list of purchases. >> it's a luxury problem to have when they say they don't need stimulus anymore. >> a slowdown in china's economy also has investors worried that chinese consumers won't be able to buy as many american goods, but analyst ben willis sees an opportunity in the falling stock prices. >> you should be buying your equities in the same way you're going to the supermarket and buying things on sale. >> the scaled back stimulus is pushed mortgage rates up, but that's not necessarily bad news for the housing market. >> a lot of people have been on the side looichbs waiting for whatever reason but they've decided rather than wait for the rates to gown further, they're going to get back in the marketing. >> it will be scaled back gradually only if the economy continues to gain speed and the job market improves. >>> let's talk more about the markets with lauren lyst
or follow me on twitt. all right. next on "money," no matter how the economy's doing, apparently you can always bet on a sandwich. a huge expansion in the face of obamacare and stiff competition. the ceo joins us explain how. but should executives be allowed toump their comny stock? bread before i ceo steps down. details on a growing controversy the chairman, t is all the work of thetreet. this is a good one. piles of "money" coming up. ♪ melissa: this is one of the issues that we talke about on our shw. jobs in the economy. we know that it has been given how close e last few years. one company has been given 800 new jobs just this honor. i am wondering the same thing. how is this? let me welcome the c of firehouse. bob, you have cations in 35 states. but still, 800just this summer is a lot 2400 workers in 2013 hae said that you have done a lot of expanding even though the economy has not grown up fast. >> yes, americans have an insatiable appetite for great food. while the restaurant business is very competitive, they ar continuing to grow in this environment. we have the second high
the buying spree. >>> meanwhile, across the pond they are talking the global economy. the g8 summit is under way in northern ireland, but it's not all about monetary policy. cbs reporter tara mergener on the discussions expected on u.s. wiretapping and syria. >> hello, everybody. >> reporter: president obama and british prime minister david cameron visited a northern ireland school where students are learning about the g8 summit. >> i think i just went outside the lines. >> reporter: but soon, the president and his counterparts turned their attention to the global economy. >> i'm pleased to join these leaders to announce the launch of negotiations on a new trade agreement. >> reporter: the economy is not the only topic at the g8. the civil war in syria is expected to dominate talks including president obama's meeting with russian president vladimir putin. russia supports bashar al-assad and sells him weapons. putin opposes president obama's plan to give military assistance to rebel forces trying to overthrow the government calling the fighters barbarians. >> are these the people you want to
the measures taken by the u.s., eurozone and japan helped reduce risks to the global economy. economic activity and employment in most advanced nations have yet to recover. they also referred to the policies and challenges of certain countries. they said japan's economic growth will be supported by short-term fiscal stimulus and easing and the strategy for boosting sector investments. the leaders said japan will need to compile a medium term plan to improve the fiscal standing. prime minister abe announced other g 8 leaders said japan's economic recovery was positive for the global economy. >> translator: i told the other leaders that japan needed drastic measures like my three hours to call the country out on deflation. and the figures for production, consumption, and the job market have already improved. i told them we need to promote more growth strategies. the leaders approached me with various opinions, but i won their approval regarding japan's economic policies. >> u.s. markets ended higher after upbeat housing data boosted sentiments later today on tuesday. the dow jones gained nearly 3
bit. still means that there's monster stimulus coming into the economy. - were you surprised, though, how quickly people traded off that news coming in from the wall street journal, and then the financial times, during the session? that really moved the market. - i think there has been very little volatility. the move index, which people don't talk about too much, is similar to the vix index. the vix index is the volatility index in the stock market. the move index is a similar index for the bond market. it was at an all-time low at the beginning of may. it was at about 48. as of last week, it got into the mid 80s. so in may, i don't think the market necessarily, from a chain-weighted option volatility index, was expecting much of a move. as these numbers came into the market and some of the rhetoric came into the market, i think it caught people a little bit behind in terms of their hedging. so i think that caused the market to rally and race a little bit to get to a point where people feel like if there is some tapering, they are a little more comfortable with where rates are. - go
be achieved through diplomacy. >> talk on the global economy were less contentious. the g8 leaders say it is in better shape than last year but still needs growth. there is also agreement on working to put attacks havens out of business. they pledged more transparency to curtail tax evasion and avoidance worldwide. >> taxation is one of the big issues where the g-8 says they made progress today. >> tax evasion and avoidance were under discussion. invasion is illegal, avoidance is not, but sometimes the line between between them can be hard to draw. >> they are under fire for breaking the rules or pushing them to the limits. they want to make practices harder and tax havens from the caribbean to the heart of europe. click the picturesque villages technically in austria, but the only road in his from germany. there have never been border controls here making it easy to hide german money in the neighboring country with lower tax rates. >> there are about 4 billion euro in three banks here. more than 99% of the money comes from germany, most of it probably undeclared. clicks tax evasion ha
. the chinese economy opened up a world of opportunities. a world of brand new shoppers. >> farmers are leaving these fields and are not becoming just workers but consumers. they are off to join the middle class. >> welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. kennedy'sfter john f. famous speech in berlin -- president obama a vote the cold war -- with a call to stop nuclear weapons. he asked for the u.s. and russia to reduce their stockpiles by one-third. the reaction from moscow was dismissive. >> president obama inspected the troops in the city that has known to much war. facing east of the brandenburg gate, he was cheered for removing his coat. >> i am feeling so good i am going to take off my jacket. >> speaking from behind bulletproof glass, he said the city has withstood war but has to be torn down. >> we can say in berlin and europe, our values one, onwon.ce and freedom >> he said they had to help people in burma and afghanistan. >> these people want to join the free world -- free world. they want our support because they are citizens of berlin in their own way. >> h
talks with the taliban. the chinese economy opened up a world of opportunities. a world of brand new shoppers. >> farmers are leaving these fields and are not becoming just workers but consumers. they are off to join the middle class. >> welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. kennedy'sfter john f. famous speech in berlin -- president obama a vote the cold war -- with a call to stop nuclear weapons. he asked for the u.s. and russia to reduce their stockpiles by one-third. the reaction from moscow was dismissive. >> president obama inspected the troops in the city that has known to much war. facing east of the brandenburg gate, he was cheered for removing his coat. >> i am feeling so good i am going to take off my jacket. >> speaking from behind bulletproof glass, he said the city has withstood war but has to be torn down. >> we can say in berlin and europe, our values one, onwon.ce and freedom >> he said they had to help people in burma and afghanistan. >> these people want to join the free world -- free world. they want our support because they are citizens
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